[I’m taking a blogging break until 5/31, so am putting up favorite food posts from the archives in the interim] Can we call this national make-pizza-at-home week?  That would make me really happy.  Why?  Because pizza at home is so good, so easy, and so so affordable.  But what I want to focus on here is the EASY part.  This is why I really loved Sam Sifton’s NYTimes mag article on pizza (except for that truly shameless plug of Jay McInerny’s new book—are they pals? Really had to stretch even to make sense).  But: Pizza at home IS so easy it got me wanting to make pizza for breakfast: bacon and eggs pizza?  Why not?! I loved his stressing the fact that you don’t have to have a stone oven that goes to 800 degrees Read On »

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Earlier this week, I shot a video on grilling for a new digital magazine being created by Sideways.  I did a spatchcocked chicken, grilled asparagus and also sausage, because, after the infrenal boneless skinless chicken breast, it’s the most overcooked meat in America, and yet it’s rightly beloved here. In my experience people err because they’re afraid of not cooking it enough.  So they either cook it over really high heat, overcooking the outside, busting open the sausage, or they kill it with too much moderate heat. As we move into grilling season, and there’s no better way to cook a sausage than over the smoky heat of live coals, I encourage you to grill sausages often.  All carnivores around you will be happier. There are two stages to grilling a sausage to perfection.  Start Read On »

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For all the interest in food, chefs, and restaurants, the popularity of “Top Chef” and other shows depicting professional restaurant work, most poeple still have no clear conception of the unique, bizarre, intense, exhalted, depraved, mysterious human stew that restaurants are. Yesterday, New York Times writer Ron Lieber blogged about being kicked out of Marc Forgione’s New York City restaurant.  Disturbed by the chef’s protracted yelling at a member of the staff, he marched back to the kitchen to tell the chef what for. The upshot was that Mr. Lieber was asked to leave. (It’s a good post, read it.) Mr. Lieber asked for comment on the blog. Times restaurant critic Sam Sifton called attention to it on Twitter, to which I gave a loud guffaw at Mr. Lieber’s act.  He could have been dressed Read On »

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I needed a dinner that was easy and delicious, would please everyone, one that also reheated well in case my daughter’s track meet ran late, and I had to be able to make it long before serving so it would be just a matter of reheating come dinnertime.  There are of course a thousand options that fit these criteria, but last week, I was in a nostalgic mood and thought back to school lunches, one of my favorites, macaroni and beef.  We were always famished by lunchtime and this dish was dependable and impossible to screw up by a 1970’s school kitchen. For a midweek meal I went as simple as could be.  The only way I’d change it, I decided would be to pile a monstrous amount of cheddar and mozzarella on top at Read On »

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All kinds of awesome things happen to me because I live in Cleveland.  Others are seeing it too—my favorite line from the Beard awards reception Monday, slightly boozy but true nonetheless: “Cleveland is happening!” the California girl shouted to me.  “Cleveland is on the cusp of greatness!” Earlier in the year a company called Sideways called me saying they were fans and cooks and wanted to create a template for an “Author App,” basically a fan app that allows people interested in an author to access everything he or she has to offer, in quick seamless fashion. I was game and I knew that my passionate, occasionally disturbed follow, would find it interesting.  Watch the video above, download it FREE from iTunes. It is, of course, the irony of fate that I would introduce this Read On »

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